D&D FORGOTTEN REALMS FAITHS AND PANTHEONS PDF

Faiths and Pantheons is a campaign accessory for the 3rd edition of the Dungeons & Dragons, for the Forgotten Realms campaign setting. This is a list of Forgotten Realms deities. They are all deities that appear in the fictional Forgotten Realms campaign setting of the Dungeons & Dragons role- playing game. The deities of other Dungeons & Dragons campaign settings, including those He alone can allow new deities to join the pantheons of Forgotten Realms. May 4, Faiths and Pantheons by Eric L. Boyd and Erik Mona offers an incredible amount of information on the primary deities of the Forgotten Realms.

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This site works best with JavaScript enabled. Please enable C&d to get the best experience from this site. People in the Forgotten Realms, for example, might pray to Sune for luck in love, make an offering to Waukeen before heading to the market, and pray to appease Talos when a severe storm blows in—all in the same day. Many people have a favorite among the gods, one whose ideals and teachings they make their own. Your DM determines which gods, if any, are worshiped in his or her campaign. From among the gods available, you can choose a single deity for your character to serve, worship, or pay lip service to.

Or you can pick a few that your character prays to most often.

This appendix deals with one pantheon, that of the Forgotten Realms. Dozens of deities are revered, worshiped, forgktten feared throughout the world of the Forgotten Realms. At least thirty deities are widely known across the Realms, and many more are worshiped locally, by individual tribes, small cults, or certain sects of larger religious temples. Certain gods closely associated with nonhuman races are revered on many different worlds, though not always in the same way. The nonhuman races of the Forgotten Realms and Greyhawk share these deities.

Nonhuman races often have whole pantheons of their own. Individual clans and kingdoms of dwarves might revere some, all, or none of these deities, and some have other gods unknown or known by other names to outsiders. They sprang from the brook f&d stream, their might heightened by the strength of faighs oak and the beauty of the woodlands and open moor.

When the first forester dared put a name to the face seen in the bole of a tree or the voice babbling in a brook, these gods forced themselve s into being. The Celtic gods are as often served by druids as by clerics, for they are closely aligned with the forces of nature that dr uids revere.

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The gods of Olympus make themselves known with the gentle lap of waves against the shores and the crash of the thunder among the cloud-enshrouded peaks.

The thick boar-infested pantehons and the sere, olive-covered hillsides hold evidence of their passing. The Egyptian pantheon is unusual in having three gods with the Death domain of different alignments. Anubis is the lawful neutral god of the afterlife, who judges the souls of the dead.

Set is a chaotic evil god of murder, perhaps best known for forgitten his brother Osiris. And Nephthys is a chaotic good goddess of mourning. Where the land plummets from the snowy hills into the icy fjords below, where the longboats draw up on to the beach, where the glaciers flow forward and retreat with every fall and spring—this is the land of the Vikings, the home of the Norse pantheon. Their powers reflect the need these warriors had for strong leadership and decisive action.

Thus, they see their deities in every bend of a river, hear them in the crash of the thunder and the booming of the glaciers, and smell them in the smoke of a burni ng longhouse. The Norse pantheon includes two main families, the Aesir deities of war and destiny and the Vanir gods of fertility and prosperity. Once enemies, these two families are now closely allied against their common enemies, the giants including the gods Surtur and Thrym.

Like the gods of Greyhawk, gods in different families sometimes have overlap in their spheres of influence: Frey of the Vanir and Odur o f the Aesir are both associated with the sun, for example. The Forgotten Realms Dozens of deities are revered, worshiped, and feared throughout the world of the Forgotten Realms. Nonhuman Deities Certain gods closely associated with nonhuman races are revered on many different worlds, though not always in the same way.

The Greek Pantheon The gods of Olympus make themselves known with the gentle lap of waves against the shores and &dd crash of the thunder among the cloud-enshrouded peaks.

The Norse Pantheon Where the land plummets from the snowy hills into the icy fjords below, where the longboats draw up on to the beach, where the glaciers flow forward and retreat with every fall and spring—this is the land of the Vikings, the home of the Norse pantheon. Upright black right hand, thumb and fingers together.

Circle of seven stars, or nine stars encircling a flowing red mist, or a single star. Three lightning bolts radiating from a central point. The Daghdha, god of weather and crops. Bubbling cauldron or shield. Arawn, god of life and death. Black star on gray background. Belenus, god of sun, light, and warmth. Reals disk and standing stones. Brigantia, goddess of rivers and livestock. Diancecht, god of medicine and healing. Crossed oak and mistletoe branches. Dunatis, god of mountains and peaks.

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Red sun-capped mountain peak. Goibhniu, god of smiths and healing. Lugh, god of arts, travel, and commerce. Manannan mac Lir, god of oceans and sea creatures.

Wave of white water on green.

Nuada, god of war and warriors. Silver hand on black background. Oghma, god of speech and writing. Silvanus, god of nature and forests. Zeus, god of the rwalms, ruler of the gods. Fist full of lightning bolts. Aphrodite, goddess of love and beauty.

Apollo, god of light, music, and healing. Artemis, goddess of hunting and childbirth. Athena, goddess of wisdom and civilization. Demeter, goddess of realmd. Dionysus, god of mirth and wine.

Thyrsus staff tipped with pine cone. Eealms, god of the underworld. Hecate, goddess of magic and the moon. Hephaestus, god of smithing and craft. Hera, goddess of marriage and intrigue. Hercules, god of strength and adventure. Hermes, god of travel and commerce.

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Caduceus winged staff and serpents. Hestia, goddess of home and family. Poseidon, god of the sea and earthquakes. Tyche, goddess of good fortune. Re-Horakhty, god of the sun, ruler of the gods. Solar disk encircled by serpent. Anubis, god of judgment and death. Apep, god of evil, fire, and serpents. Bast, goddess of cats and vengeance. Image of the misshapen eealms.

Faiths and Pantheons (Forgotten Realms) (Dungeons & Dragons 3rd Edition)

Hathor, goddess of love, music, and motherhood. Imhotep, god of crafts and medicine. Isis, goddess of fertility and magic. Nephthys, goddess of death and grief. Osiris, god of nature and the underworld. Ptah, god of fwiths, knowledge, and reams. Set, god of darkness and desert storms. Sobek, god of water and crocodiles.

Crocodile head with horns and plumes. Thoth, god of knowledge and wisdom. Odin, god of knowledge and war. Aegir, god of the sea and storms. Balder, god of beauty and poetry. Forseti, god of justice and law. Frey, god of fertility and the sun. Freya, goddess of fertility and love.

Frigga, goddess of birth and fertility. Heimdall, god of watchfulness and loyalty.